tomkirk
My name is Katie, and I love bears.

I also love books, movies, TV, baseball, art, and Mindy Kaling.

I am currently reading my life away.

clater:

i went to a public school okay i know how to inject heroin

nostalgic-dreaming:

Karwendel #16 by hannahschmucker on Flickr.
priveting:

untitled (by Dragon T)

I just stayed up until 5:40 am to watch Veronica Mars.

sukforhonesty:

Yeah Yeah Yeahs | Down Boy

sproutin:

rxndomparadise:

the-great-gayby:

Lady, running down to the riptide
Taken away to the dark side
I wanna be your left hand man
I love you when you’re singing that song
And I got a lump in my throat
'Cause you're gonna sing the words wrong

sproutin every time i hear this song, it reminds of driving at night to skinny dip at the lake/watch the sunset at fish ranch :)

ahh i love that!! need to go dip right now

"

Flannel shirt on the subway,
I love you.
Bodyguard arms, hands
clasped below the bellybutton.
Who are you protecting?

From across the train, I love you.
And maybe I can’t remember your
face, but I remember your clothes.

I remember the girl waiting for
you at the station and how your
body uncoiled at the sight of her.

I remember the slouch of your back once she touched you.


From the other end of Brooklyn,
I love you. Could have loved you.

Not as a stranger on the train,
not as a pair of eyes looking
too long, blinking.

Heart beating too fast
and screaming
not mine not mine not mine.


In another world, I am the dream on
the platform, one foot on the yellow
line, waiting for your walk.

I kiss the rigid out of you.

I take your name out from under
my tongue and hand it to you.

"

- Caitlyn Siehl, Subway (via hiswordssplashedmewithstars)
"Death Cab for Cutie’s Transatlanticism played in the background of countless decade-old milestones around the world, especially the ones involving first kisses and so forth, and it’s no wonder. The album, and its epic title song in particular, played on an endless loop across popular culture — on movie soundtracks and in dramatic moments from such TV shows as Six Feet Under. The way singer Ben Gibbard channeled youthful confusion, vulnerability and sweetness mirrored universal fumbling feelings of growing up and facing down the complexities of love, heartbreak, long-distance yearning and budding nostalgia. From the first line of its first song (“So this is the new year / and I don’t feel any different”), Transatlanticism swims in uncertainty, as if its narrator isn’t even quite sure how feelings work yet."

- NPR (via mimasux)